Do you hear what I hear? Time to pay real attention to what they are saying.

In less than one hour,  the President of the Hellenic Republic is going to once again try to find a solution so that this parliament can form a government and not go to a new election. *

Right now, SYRIZA will not attend. DIMAR of Fotis Kouvelis who could work with ND and PASOK to form a government insists it will not do so if SYRIZA is unwilling to join as well.

So why are they all still talking, and why are there so many talking heads on television pointing fingers at each other without any reasonable outcome.

Why are they not talking about who will work with whom after the next election?

Honestly, this is what voters must demand that they do right now. All the rest is just an attempt to blow smoke to cover-up for their inability to come up with solutions.

PS. Meeting is over. More talk tomorrow. They didn’t accept the formation of a government of non-political actors but that of technocrats. If they don’t reach an agreement after all this talk it’s just obvious that they cannot provide the way out of this crisis.

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One response to “Do you hear what I hear? Time to pay real attention to what they are saying.

  1. on the front line, ordinary hard working and tax paying greeks have not been able to do basic business transactions for some time now. for example:

    my father is a greek american who brings to greece social security check, ira cashout, rent money from his stores in the usa, bond payouts from his investments, all adding up to about 100 thousand dollars wire tranfer to ethniki trapeza: the dollar account is wired to a euro account and he takes money out to build small homes for rent on the island we come from:

    he has licenses to build several houses and has build a road and got DEH poles placed and has water: infrastructure for a small cluster of homes or an extension of a village.

    he works with our relatives: my second cousin has a “madra” or a hardware and plumbing store: he has to pay off his loan for a bulldozer and large tranport freight truck that he invested in to import building materials to the island.

    so my dad goes to bank to get cash to start building foundations and get bricks and cement at a goood price: there is an inventory overload. problem is once he starts project, if he gets the workers, contractors and specialized builders such as plumbers, electricians,and skilled carpenders (a hodgepodge of albanians and greek cousins) no one can wait for the cash to come over from the usa so hence everything is cash on delivery:

    Ok so we save our money to have the cash reserves to make this happen and wait for the euro to drop: problem now is THERE IS NO CASH IN BANKS TO MAKE A SIMPLE PROJECT GO:

    he needed about 20 thousand euro’s to do everything to make things happen including have funds to pay taxes for workers to eventually get the electricity and certificate of occupency so we could rent to summer renter by 2013.

    NO CASH IS available to make things go: the banks do not have the cash and are giving out bank certificates that expire in 3 days for my dad to make things go: no one trusts checks like they do in this country and we have a big problem with just moving forward. MY cousin, who has the madra has to immediately pay off his loan and cannot extend any credit and needs the money up front to pay everything he owns the same day.

    the bank certificats or certified checks are time limited too 3 days:

    how could such a situation not be foreseen by the trioka or norther europeans? we are blaming ourselves as greeks but if you really think about the macroeconomics of the austerity plan: it leaves no money or units of exchange to conduct normal business amoungst ordinary tax paying citizens.

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